Participants of the Caine Prize Workshop, 2012.

My Volmoed Journey

By Tendai Mwanaka

I really wanted to get into the waterfall or at the very least get close enough to touch it. When I got near it, I felt like I was a part of it. Below was a deep green pool. I was not sure how deep, but anything that appeared too deep has always scared me. So I could not begin to imagine what might lie inside. I imagined water animals that I’m not fond of: snakes, mermaids, and crocodiles. But, I was mostly scared of the Njuzu that day, so we enjoyed it from the outside. It’s not a joke, I am afraid of these aquatic half human creatures. In my culture and country, these creatures are associated with supernatural forces, for instance it is believed the most potent traditional healers is of the Njuzu calling. It is said that they were often people who had been abducted by a Njuzu and secreted deep inside caves, in the river’s pools, where they would be taught the trade. So growing up, we were always afraid of river pools that were said to have Njuzu in them. Afraid we might be abducted by these supernatural creatures. It is also believed that should people mourn for you after your abduction, these creatures would kill you. Thus you can understand my fear of these creatures at that instance.

Money shot

The Money Shot

By Amy Heydenrych

They have a checklist that demands scenes of abundance, women being employed and hands holding fountains of grain.

These pictures will be emailed to countries their subjects will never see. They will be placed on billboards and websites by men who believe their USD 100 000 grant is enough to transform entire communities.

“Karibu!” The owner of the factory I am visiting clasps my arm with chapped hands. The dank, malt scent of the animal feed they are processing coils into my lungs. I hold in the urge to wheeze.

Saleeha Idrees Bamjee

Saleeha Idrees Bamjee

Saaleha is a freelance writer, photographer and designer. She has an MA in Creative Writing from Rhodes University. Her poetry has appeared in several South African literary journals. She lives and works in the south of Johannesburg. Saleeha’s beautiful, and at times delicious, work can be found here, on her website.